“There’s Someone Inside Your House:” The Ultimate Gen Z Slasher Movie

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When most people think of slasher movies, they think of common horror tropes like jumping fears, the killer who magically disappears and, of course, the last girl. “There is someone inside your house” is no exception to this rule.

Filled with brooding plans, high school parties, and sometimes even full-blown dry humor, this Netflix original encompasses the high school experience while paying homage to the horror genre.

The film stars Sydney Park, Theodore Pellerin, Asjha Cooper, Jesse LaTourette, Diego Josef and Dale Whibley. It is loosely based on the novel of the same name by Stephanie Perkins.

Directed by Patrick Brice and produced by the producers of “The Conjuring” and “Stranger Things”, “There’s Someone Inside Your House” perfectly executes common horror tropes with a touch of dialogue and dialogue. spirit of Generation Z.

WARNING: SPOILERS TO COME

Background

Set in Nebraska, a series of bizarre murders take place against high school students. Right before each murder, the killer reveals the victim’s most precious secret. For one girl, it was the audio of her making racist comments. For another, it was photos of him bullying a gay college student, and finally, for Makani Young, it was an audio recording of his trial for pushing a girl through the fire.

Makani Young, played by the talented Sydney Park, has moved from Hawaii to Nebraska to escape her dark past, but she continues to follow her. She makes a strong group of friends that includes Rodrigo, Alex, Darby, and Zach with whom she spends the majority of her time indulging in occasional banter. Each of them seems to have their own set of personal issues, but Rodrigo and Zach are the ones who are represented the most. Rodrigo is addicted to painkillers and Zach has a difficult relationship with his wealthy father who buys all the land in town.

Makani faces her own battles, feelings of guilt from her past, and fear that her secret from her past will come out, adding a sense of suspense to the film. “When I first read the script I thought maybe it was the killer,” actress Sydney Park said.

As the film continues, the viewer learns that Makani has a relationship with Ollie Larsson, played by Theodore Pellerin, a social outcast at the school. Pellerin portrays Ollie with a strange and sexy air at the same time.

As the murders increase one by one, many of Makani’s friends, especially Alex, are convinced that he is the killer. At one point, Makani is targeted but her friend saves her in time.

However, at the end of the film, viewers discover that the person behind the murders is not Ollie, but Zach, Makani’s close friend and known socialite. All of his murders led him to his ultimate goal: to kill his father.

The final scene shows all of the surviving students graduating from high school.

To do magic

Throughout the film, viewers see classic jumps, blood and blood, but also a group of friends who have a close bond.

On the set, it was like that too. “Me and the cast really hit it off. I never got to go to college, so this particular experience reminded me of a college experience, ”Park said. Park went on to explain that she was drawn to the script because Netflix always promotes diversity and inclusion in their films and it was a unique story to tell.

This particular sense of the horror experience of young adults reminded Park of horror films like “Scream” and “I know what you did last summer”, but also of films passing through. adulthood as “The Breakfast Club”. “We paid tribute and respected the GOs, but we created something new,” Park said.

However, sometimes it feels like the movie is trying to tick too many boxes. Just when the film feels like it’s going to dive into heavy topics like racism, homophobia, and capitalism, it backs off and falls back into superficial dialogue. There is also a lack of construction and character development that is necessary to understand the motivations of the characters.

Despite these minor flaws, “There is someone inside your house” sums up Gen Z lingo and campy slasher vibes, forming an enjoyable movie for a Friday night at home, with candles lit and the lights off.


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