Dive Program – Master Diver http://masterdiver.net/ Wed, 25 May 2022 06:13:17 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://masterdiver.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2-e1624424277963-150x150.png Dive Program – Master Diver http://masterdiver.net/ 32 32 Best Emmy-nominated shows of all time | Entertainment https://masterdiver.net/best-emmy-nominated-shows-of-all-time-entertainment/ Wed, 25 May 2022 03:36:47 +0000 https://masterdiver.net/best-emmy-nominated-shows-of-all-time-entertainment/ The first Emmy Awards show was held at the Hollywood Athletic Club in 1949. Hosted by Walter O’Keefe, tickets to the show were $5 and only six awards were presented, including one to a ventriloquist. Named after the image-orthicon camera tube, or “immy,” which was instrumental in capturing images for television, the Emmys were created […]]]>

The first Emmy Awards show was held at the Hollywood Athletic Club in 1949. Hosted by Walter O’Keefe, tickets to the show were $5 and only six awards were presented, including one to a ventriloquist.

Named after the image-orthicon camera tube, or “immy,” which was instrumental in capturing images for television, the Emmys were created by the Television Academy to recognize excellence in filmmaking. television industry. The Emmy Award statue was designed to be a winged woman, representing the arts, holding an atom, representing science. He was modeled after the wife of television engineer Louis McManus, Dorothy McManus. Over time, the Emmy Award has been acclaimed and has become one of the most prestigious awards in the entertainment industry.

On the occasion of the Emmy Awards, Stacker has compiled a comprehensive ranking of the best Emmy-nominated shows based on IMDb User Ratings, with ties broken by votes. The data was obtained in May 2022. All dramas, comedies, competitions, varieties, anthologies and limited series that have been nominated for at least one Emmy and have more than 2,500 votes from IMDb users have been considered in the ranking. Nature documentary series have not been considered in this list.

Over the years, the Emmys have become an award show where anything can happen. From an impromptu meeting between Julia Louis-Dreyfus of “Veep” and Bryan Cranston of “Breaking Bad” to a fruitless prank to steal the award from Betty Thomas to Viola Davis’ powerful speech about diversity in the entertainment industry – the Emmy Awards have always brought together visionaries and artists with diverse perspectives.

You might also like: 25 Most Popular Emmy-Nominated Shows of 2019

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Break down your built-in barriers https://masterdiver.net/break-down-your-built-in-barriers/ Sun, 22 May 2022 22:10:53 +0000 https://masterdiver.net/break-down-your-built-in-barriers/ Ideas in organizations die all the time, not because they’re bad ideas, but because they don’t have an owner. One thing became clear to me while working on the last Associations now In depth on diversity, equity and inclusion, the success of any program is highly dependent on intentionality: organizations must commit to concrete goals […]]]>

Ideas in organizations die all the time, not because they’re bad ideas, but because they don’t have an owner. One thing became clear to me while working on the last Associations now In depth on diversity, equity and inclusion, the success of any program is highly dependent on intentionality: organizations must commit to concrete goals and ensure that there are people who are committed to them. held responsible.

At the Case Manager Certification Commission, this process accelerated in 2019, when it created a DEI subcommittee. According to CEO MaryBeth Kurland, CAE, volunteer leaders were concerned that some communities were being excluded from the profession on several fronts – because CCMC had defined its membership base too narrowly, made access to its credentials too difficult and n was not doing enough to reach diverse groups of potential certifiers.

“We were asking, what should we be doing in this space as an accreditation body?” Kurland said. “We wanted to make sure there were no barriers to certification or recertification or review.”

“There are tons of qualified nurses and social workers who are not white women over 45 – how do we reach these people?”

MaryBeth Kurland, CAE

CCMC embarked on this process knowing that there was a diversity gap that needed to be filled. “If you look at the profile of our typical case manager, most case managers even now are probably white women over 45 who are nurses,” she says. “And what we’ve said is we have to do something about changing the needle, because there are tons of qualified nurses and social workers who aren’t white women over 45 – how can we reach these people?”

One answer to this question was simply to start making connections. During the pandemic, CCMC reached out to Black, Hispanic, and Asian nursing associations to raise awareness about the organization and invite members to present at its conferences. Along with this effort, CCMC has lowered barriers to accessing certification opportunities, reducing fees and creating more free educational tools. He also started a workforce development initiative where, says Kurland, “we were trying to encourage more people earlier in their careers, from a variety of backgrounds, to get certified, or at least consider case management and disability management as potential professions”.

For better or worse, the stress of the healthcare industry during the pandemic – and the ensuing staff turnover – has created an opportunity for CCMC to rethink its community and its certification process.

“The pressure on the healthcare system and the people who would be eligible for certification is real — the big quit is real,” Kurland says. “The hope is that because many organizations, hospitals and insurance companies need to recruit to bring more people into these spaces, it may bring in new faces who might consider [case management] careers.”

Achieving this goal will take time, but there is evidence that the approach can work: the Casualty Actuarial Society, for example, saw increased diversity among people taking its certification exams after the CAS stepped up its outreach efforts direct. A mix of marketing, direct inquiries and awareness of candidate needs will be essential for CCMC to grow. “We take a multi-pronged approach,” says Kurland. “Hopefully we will see more growth.”

(Feodora/iStock/Getty Images Plus)

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New scholarship program supports diversity in scientific diving https://masterdiver.net/new-scholarship-program-supports-diversity-in-scientific-diving/ Thu, 19 May 2022 14:10:25 +0000 https://masterdiver.net/new-scholarship-program-supports-diversity-in-scientific-diving/ The Scripps-led DIVERsity Fellowship Program is accepting applications for the Fall 2022 cohort until June 3 For some marine researchers, becoming a certified scientific diver is a game-changer. This certification can have a profound impact on the research experiences and career opportunities available to scientists interested in the underwater environment. But the path to scientific […]]]>

The Scripps-led DIVERsity Fellowship Program is accepting applications for the Fall 2022 cohort until June 3

For some marine researchers, becoming a certified scientific diver is a game-changer. This certification can have a profound impact on the research experiences and career opportunities available to scientists interested in the underwater environment.

But the path to scientific diver status – defined by the American Academy of Underwater Sciences (AAUS) – is long, costly and influenced by a long but ever-changing history of unequal access to opportunity.

A new program from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego seeks to break down some of these barriers and aims to make the diving community a more inclusive space. Officially launched in the fall of 2022, the DIVERSity scholarship program will support a small cohort of exceptional and diverse UC San Diego undergraduate and graduate students who want to contribute to oceanographic research but who face barriers to inclusion in scientific diving programs.

A group of Scripps graduate students return from their dive. Photos by Erik Jepsen/University Communications.

“Our goal with the DIVERsity scholarship program is to dismantle some of the systemic barriers that exist for underrepresented students who want to become scientific divers,” said Keiara Auzenne, director of Scripps Diversity Initiatives. “As a leader in scientific diving, Scripps has the opportunity here to help build a more inclusive future not just for scientific divers, but for the diving community as a whole.”

The initiative has already received six years of funding thanks to contributions from several members of the Scripps Director’s Council and the Scripps Education Department. Diving equipment manufacturer ScubaPro is also offering support by supplying the first cohort of fellows with soft gear including wetsuits, masks, fins and snorkels.

Each year, the program would see a new cohort of three to five fellows who would receive diver training in addition to the support of a dedicated faculty sponsor and mentor who is an active scientific diver. Students lacking water experience would have access to swimming and water safety lessons offered by UC San Diego Recreation. Mentors will help fellows enroll in appropriate swimming lessons (if needed), offer advice on how to become a better diver, and provide mental, emotional and professional support as the mentee progresses in their certification process.

Once a DIVERsity Fellow has achieved scientific diver certification, they will serve as an official mentor for the next cohort.

Doors opened by diving

The concept for the program emerged several years ago as a result of conversations between Scripps PhD candidate Erica Ferrer and PhD candidate Alyssa Griffin. The two had shared the financial, physical and emotional challenges they encountered while completing their respective dive programs, and the successes that followed their certifications.

“We were a bit amazed that once we got that certification, the doors opened, like magic,” said Ferrer, who got certified while finishing her undergraduate degree. at UC Santa Cruz. “Suddenly you have access to all these opportunities that you maybe didn’t even know existed before.”

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Scripps graduate students participate in a scientific diving course in 2019.

While Ferrer enjoyed learning to dive and participating in subtidal science, she had to go into debt to pay for her training. Luckily for her, the risk paid off, as it opened the door to a summer job researching Ischia, an island in the Gulf of Naples, Italy. She also believes the certification helped her get into Scripps’ marine biology graduate program, where she is currently studying the sustainability of small-scale fisheries.

Now she wants to make sure other students, who might face similar financial challenges, have an easier experience becoming scientific divers.

“I want to make sure students like me feel like they can participate in science diving and don’t have to go into debt to do it because it was a risk,” she said. declared. “Thinking back to my decision to get certified, it seems so clear, but when I went there, I didn’t know if I was going to be able to recoup the costs. I didn’t know if I was making a terrible financial and life decision. I had no idea and it was very scary.

Griffin, who learned to dive very late in his PhD program at Scripps due to financial barriers, called scientific diving “transformational” for his work in marine geochemistry.

“The diving really opened up a whole world of possibilities in terms of the questions I could address and the processes I could observe,” said Griffin, now a Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellow at UC Davis. “It really allowed me to expand my science and my ability to do science.”

Ferrer and Griffin worked closely with Auzenne and Scripps Dive Safety Officer Christian McDonald to write the proposal for the DIVERsity scholarship and got the green light for the program to start in fall 2022.

Obstacles to success

In their proposal, Ferrer and Griffin identified cost as one of the biggest barriers for potential scientific divers. In addition to actual scuba lessons, certification requires expensive scuba gear, medical exams and more, costing several thousand dollars. Course prerequisites are another hurdle, as prior scuba diving experience and advanced swimming skills are often required, further impacting marginalized groups who have been consistently denied access to scuba diving. ‘water.

Ferrer and Griffin also noted the general lack of ethnic, racial, and gender diversity in the broader scuba diving community. Official statistics made available by the Professional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI) suggest that the recreational diving community is heavily dominated by middle and upper class men, with the majority earning salaries of over $100,000 per year. year. Demographics within the scientific diving community are not currently tracked or made available to the public, but anecdotal evidence suggests that divers of color are few and far between.

turn the tide

Through the DIVERsity Fellowship Program, Ferrer and Griffin hope that Scripps can help bring about a culture change within the diving community, serving as both a partner and a model for other organizations and institutions to support diversity. and inclusion in diving.

Scripps is well positioned to lead such an effort, with over a century of experience in underwater exploration and seven decades of bold science via scuba diving. In 1954, Scripps founded the first ever science-based diving safety programsetting the standard for diver education at the University of California and inspiring the creation of other scientific diving programs like this around the world.

“I think the status and reputation of Scripps’ scientific diving program provides a really important opportunity to model this program and pilot this program,” Griffin said, “and we hope other institutions will follow.”

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Two Scripps grad students prepare for a course dive in 2019.

Several other programs that support diversity in diving are already underway, including The Diversity Project at UCLA.

McDonald, who currently runs the Scientific diving program at Scripps, said he looked forward to supporting the effort at UC San Diego.

“I’ve seen over the years how transformative the experience of diving and access to the ocean can be for people,” he said. “It’s exciting for me to try to create opportunities for people who wouldn’t otherwise have access to the sea or the ocean, to just create a pathway for that and see how we can help transform their experience.”

Applications for the fall 2022 cohort will be accepted until June 3. The program is open to undergraduate and graduate students at UC San Diego, with priority given to underrepresented students whose research would benefit from scientific diving certification. Visit the Scripps SCUBA DIVERsity webpage to learn more about the program and see Scripps SCUBA DIVERsity Fellowship Program Application, 2022 – 2023 to apply.

Philanthropic donations such as those in support of DIVERSity scholarship program contribute to the Campaign for UC San Diego– a comprehensive, university-wide fundraising effort ending June 30, 2022. Along with UC San Diego’s philanthropic partners, the university continues its untraditional path to groundbreaking ideas, answers unexpected, vital discoveries and impact on the planet.

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Parineeti Chopra partners with PADI to create ocean change https://masterdiver.net/parineeti-chopra-partners-with-padi-to-create-ocean-change/ Tue, 17 May 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://masterdiver.net/parineeti-chopra-partners-with-padi-to-create-ocean-change/ RANCHO SANTA MARGARITA, CA., May 17, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — PADI® is delighted to announce an exceptional PADI AmbassaDiver™: Indian actress, singer and PADI Advanced Open Water Diver Parineeti Chopra. “A PADI AmbassaDiver is someone who is passionate about using their strength for good to encourage others to protect our blue planet,” says Kristin Valette Wirth, […]]]>

RANCHO SANTA MARGARITA, CA., May 17, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — PADI® is delighted to announce an exceptional PADI AmbassaDiver™: Indian actress, singer and PADI Advanced Open Water Diver Parineeti Chopra.

“A PADI AmbassaDiver is someone who is passionate about using their strength for good to encourage others to protect our blue planet,” says Kristin Valette Wirth, Chief Brand and Membership Officer. “We could not have found a more respected and genuine partner than Ms. Chopra, a lifelong lover of the ocean, to advance our shared mission to save the ocean. She is an unparalleled example of how to protect what you love – and inspire others to do the same.”

Chopra, who has always loved the ocean, experienced the magic below the surface in 2013 when she took her first breath underwater in bali. As soon as she surfaced from that dive, she was hooked – and protecting the ocean became very personal to her, receiving her PADI Open Water Diver certification later that year in Palau. Since then, she has inspired others around the world – from family and friends to fans in India – to try scuba diving so they can join her in seeking adventure and saving the world. ‘ocean.

“The first time I came to the surface after diving, I was crying because it was such a life-changing experience,” says Ms Chopra. “It’s now something I can’t do without. I make sure to take a dive trip every three months despite my schedule because it’s my form of meditation. And it’s the place that I am extremely passionate about protection.”

“We are all equal underwater and all speak the same language. Over the years I have seen the changes that have taken place below the surface. During my time as a Brand Ambassador for Tourism Australia, I have witnessed the bleaching and damage that has happened to the Great Barrier Reef I was so sad to see this and have now committed to being a diver with a purpose I have also seen first hand main how the marine reserves, like those of Sipadan, Malaysia and Palau, prove the value of marine protected areas. As a PADI Diver, I want to make sure our entire blue planet gets the protection it deserves,” Ms. Chopra continues.

With over 67 million social media followers and having recently starred in the Netflix movie The girl on the train Chopra joins an elite group of celebrity influencers determined to take personal action and create real change for healthier oceans. Spending almost all of her free time diving around the world, Chopra shares her love for the ocean with her fans, as diving is an important part of her life that allows her to get back to nature and reset. She will work with PADI to encourage others to experience the beautiful underwater world as PADI divers and join her in helping to achieve balance between humanity and the ocean.

“PADI created the AmbassaDiver program to support extraordinary divers who dedicate their lives to illuminating the path from curiosity, exploration and discovery to understanding, stewardship and action. Ms. Chopra plays a very important role in ocean conservation, lighting the way for others to become divers themselves and mobilizing communities around the world to seek adventure and save the ocean with it,” continues Valletta Wirth.

Ms. Chopra has big plans for 2022, including becoming a real PADI mermaid and participating in citizen science projects on her diving trips around the world! Follow Chopra’s diving adventures, projects and conservation efforts with PADI on her instagram, Facebook and Twitter. To learn more about Chopra and the rest of the PADI AmbassaDiver team, visit www.padi.com/ambassadivers.

About PADI
PADI®(Professional Association of Diving Instructors®) is the world’s largest ocean exploration and diving organization, operating in 186 countries and territories, with a global network of more than 6,600 dive centers and resorts and more than 128,000 professional members worldwide. Issuing over one million certifications each year and with over 29 million certifications to date, PADI empowers people around the world to seek adventure and save the ocean through underwater education, life-changing experiences and travel. For over 50 years, PADI has undeniably been the way the world learns to dive®, maintaining its high standards of dive training, safety and customer service, monitored for worldwide consistency and quality. With a long-standing commitment to environmental conservation, PADI is paving the way for millions of people to actively explore, manage and protect the ocean through its course offerings and partnerships with like-minded organizations. similar and mission-oriented. PADI embodies a global commitment to ocean health with its mission to create one billion torchbearers to explore and protect the ocean.Seek adventure. Save the ocean.SMwww.padi.com

Media Contact: Samantha Pearson, [email protected]

PADI-SOURCE

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EHS Dive Team Celebrates a Great Season | Free https://masterdiver.net/ehs-dive-team-celebrates-a-great-season-free/ Sat, 14 May 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://masterdiver.net/ehs-dive-team-celebrates-a-great-season-free/ How many high school teams can claim that all of their athletes will compete in a state championship? Girls from Emporia High School who dive can make this statement emphatically. Its divers will “represent” at the May 19 state meeting. Of course, achieving this feat takes skill and determination, but also strong relationships. “The bond […]]]>

How many high school teams can claim that all of their athletes will compete in a state championship?

Girls from Emporia High School who dive can make this statement emphatically. Its divers will “represent” at the May 19 state meeting.

Of course, achieving this feat takes skill and determination, but also strong relationships.

“The bond I have with these girls definitely pushed me to do my best,” said senior diver Cadance Vincent. “And I think that bond pushes them too, because we’re so comfortable with each other. We know how to push each other.

Other divers expressed a similar sentiment.

“Well, the encouragement from both of them helped a lot,” said sophomore Divinity Gardner. “It helped me overcome the fear of it all. And it’s just a good complicity in diving and out of diving.

Junior Jacey Stutler said developing friendships with Vincent and Gardner made for a much better season experience.

“I feel like we all support each other,” Stutler said. “And we all encourage each other to do the dives that we struggle with…I really like having them on my team.”

Leadership and guidance are obvious factors in qualifying divers in the state domain. Barbara Clark runs the diving program – she has worked at Emporia since the 1980s – and is responsible for mentoring these girls.

“Well, you have Cadance, who was upper class…she and Jacey brought Divinity under their wing and helped her,” Clark said. “You know, the camaraderie is really good…there’s no drama, which is good.”

The girls feel that they have made significant progress throughout their participation in the program. Vincent is ranked number one in six 5-1A dives and second in 11 dives.

“I’ve definitely improved a lot since first year,” she said. “And just since the start of this season, I’ve learned so many new dives.

Gardner joined the diving program bringing a background in gymnastics – Clark was the gymnastics coach for 25 years and recruited gymnasts for diving – which helped her transition into the sport. Vincent and Stutler also have experience in gymnastics.

“Well, I had no idea what I was doing when I got in there…and I certainly learned a lot, and it all just happened, I wouldn’t say easy, but it really got me helped to have a background in gymnastics,” Garner said.

And Clark really believes in these girls. She hopes Vincent can win a state title this year. The senior placed second in 2021.

“I had…I think 11 state champions,” Clark said. “So it’s been good, and it’s going to be good if I can convince Cadance to get her this year. So our goal is to get her in there for senior year. And then the other two girls beyond the podium.

And with Clark’s accusations, it’s all about love and belief. Stutler said Clark’s communication style and constant encouragement are very helpful.

“I love Barb…I feel like I couldn’t even ask for a better coach,” Stutler said.

Vincent recognized that Clark is the main motivating factor within the team dynamic.

“She’s been there every step of the way in the seasons I’ve been diving,” Vincent said. “She pushes us to do our best…and we all love her very much.”

Gardner says Clark is one of the best coaches she’s ever had.

“She’s never too rough,” Gardner said. “But she gets you where you need to be. And it pushes you where you need to be. And that’s just awesome.

As for Clark, the end of the coaches road seems to be fast approaching.

“I feel like next year may be my last year. I think my husband is ready for us to go in the winter and be warm.

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A deep dive into the brand new WEB3 GameFi platform — Grok https://masterdiver.net/a-deep-dive-into-the-brand-new-web3-gamefi-platform-grok/ Fri, 13 May 2022 09:41:44 +0000 https://masterdiver.net/a-deep-dive-into-the-brand-new-web3-gamefi-platform-grok/ What happened: A team with more than 10 years of experience in traditional game development, which has participated in well-known projects, including Warframe, the War Machine series, Civilization Online, New World, etc. They will build a Web3 metaverse. The team is cautious and decided to start with a GameFi product. « Grok means « to […]]]>

What happened: A team with more than 10 years of experience in traditional game development, which has participated in well-known projects, including Warframe, the War Machine series, Civilization Online, New World, etc. They will build a Web3 metaverse. The team is cautious and decided to start with a GameFi product.

« Grok means « to understand », it means that when you understand something, you become part of it and even fall in love with it.—- Raven, environmental spokesperson for Grok.

Grok is currently developing an online multiplayer sandbox game and providing a powerful visual game editor. Anyone can use their editor to create their own game world and define any gameplay. You don’t need to know how to program, and you don’t need artistic skills to create various gameplays such as adventure, construction, management, growth, battle, social interaction and competition.

Important info: There are 1000 charming PLANETS in the Grok ecosystem, by holding a PLANET you can get:

  1. Airdrop of 100 LAND NFT (ERC-721), and having the right to use and exploit the land, you can get the income from creating game content in the land. Sure, you can also choose to rent the land to other users and let them help you build the planet, and all you have to do is collect the rent.
  2. Airdrop of 10% of the total $GROK token supply (100 billion GROK airdrops).
  3. Stake PLANET to earn Grok honors and participate in the Groker Identity Growth System.
  4. The privilege of having all the games from the entire GROK ecosystem.

At the end, Grok plans to release its first game in the third quarter, the game will be rolled out with the “play and win” mechanism. Grok Eco Discord users can get free game opportunities.

Official site: https://www.grok.earth
White paper: https://docs.grok.earth
Twitter: https://twitter.com/grokverse
Discord: https://discord.gg/grokverse

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Clean Up the Lake completes 72-mile underwater cleanup of Tahoe https://masterdiver.net/clean-up-the-lake-completes-72-mile-underwater-cleanup-of-tahoe/ Tue, 10 May 2022 22:31:07 +0000 https://masterdiver.net/clean-up-the-lake-completes-72-mile-underwater-cleanup-of-tahoe/ SOUTH LAKE TAHOE, Calif. ‚— The Clean Up the Lake dive team which embarked on an extraordinary effort to recover submerged trash along the 72 miles of Lake Tahoe shoreline – launched May 14, 2021 – has officially completed the project. In total, the dive team collected 24,797 pieces of trash, bringing the total weight […]]]>

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE, Calif. ‚— The Clean Up the Lake dive team which embarked on an extraordinary effort to recover submerged trash along the 72 miles of Lake Tahoe shoreline – launched May 14, 2021 – has officially completed the project. In total, the dive team collected 24,797 pieces of trash, bringing the total weight removed to 25,281 pounds.

The project was made possible by a $100,000 matching gift from Tahoe Blue Vodka, contributions from more than 135 Tahoe Fund donors, including Vail Resorts, and the Nevada Division of State Lands’ Lake Tahoe License Plate program. and other local foundations.

“Over the past year, despite winter weather, COVID and wildfire challenges, our dive team has been in the water at every opportunity to complete this unforgettable effort,” said Colin. West, founder and executive director of Clean Up the Lake. “While the dive team removed many expected and unexpected elements along the way, we hope people will eventually remember how long a group of individuals were willing to go to protect their home and their planet. , and in turn people should ask themselves how they choose to contribute to the preservation of our environment today.



Cleanup the Lake used 626 cylinders of air in 81 days of diving.
Mike Peron/Tahoe Daily Tribune

As the divers circled the lake, they recovered not just plastic bottles, cans and other “typical” trash, but items including engagement rings, 1980s Nikon cameras, street lamps whole, “no littering” signs, massive pieces of broken down boats. and engine blocks, lost wallets, cordless home phones, a Blackberry mobile phone, and more.

“Tahoe Blue Vodka sponsored this effort because we care deeply about the health of Lake Tahoe, not only because our vodka is inspired by its waters, but also because it is such an integral part of what makes our community so special,” said Matt Levitt. , founder of Tahoe Blue Vodka. “The perseverance of the dive team and volunteers who never gave up, and their commitment to continuing the cleanup efforts of Lake Tahoe and other waterways in our area is inspiring.”



Clean Up the Lake will work with scientific institutions and environmental consultants to study recovered waste to better understand its impact on Lake Tahoe. Additionally, the Tahoe Fund, with support from Tahoe Blue Vodka, recently announced that it has commissioned artists to create a sculpture using some of the objects salvaged from the lake. “Surfaced,” a permanent art installation, will be featured at the new Tahoe South Events Center to educate visitors about what lies beneath Tahoe’s blue waters.

“When we began the fundraising effort for this project, we knew it had the potential to have an incredible impact on the health of Lake Tahoe,” said Allen Biaggi, board member of the Tahoe Fund. “The individual and corporate donors who have helped make this project a reality have clearly demonstrated what Lake Tahoe means to them and that efforts like these are worthwhile. Congratulations to the Clean Up The Lake team for completing this historic project.

Clean Up the Lake is thrilled to announce that it will be performing cleanups on four lakes this year, starting next week. This will include intensive monitoring projects on Lake Tahoe and Donner Lake, a cleanup around Fallen Leaf Lake located in the Tahoe Basin, and an expansion to the Mammoth Lakes area for June Lake cleanup. West said: “I still don’t fully understand what our team has accomplished, the completion of this 72 mile cleanup is a testament to what our team is capable of, and we are just getting started.”

MJD Capital Partners and Truckee Tahoe Lumber Company are new project partners for Clean Up The Lake’s upcoming projects, while former donors including Tahoe Fund, Tahoe Blue Vodka, Nevada Division of State Lands Lake Tahoe License Plate program, Martis Fund, Tahoe Truckee Community Foundation, Tahoe Mountain Resorts Foundation, Alpenglobal Capital and others continue to support their efforts.

Despite current support, Clean Up the Lake 2022 projects require additional funding. donate, visit http://www.cleanupthelake.org/donate.

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HHCA Offers Members In-Depth Naloxone Policy Analysis https://masterdiver.net/hhca-offers-members-in-depth-naloxone-policy-analysis/ Mon, 09 May 2022 08:25:57 +0000 https://masterdiver.net/hhca-offers-members-in-depth-naloxone-policy-analysis/ Naloxone kits to deal with opioid overdoses must become a basic health and safety tool on all construction sites, alongside steel-toed boots and hard hats, workers from harm reduction in Hamilton, Ontario. Construction Safety Week audience recently. Hamilton-Halton Construction Association (HHCA) Executive Director Sue Ramsay told members that on March 1, the Ontario Legislative Assembly […]]]>

Naloxone kits to deal with opioid overdoses must become a basic health and safety tool on all construction sites, alongside steel-toed boots and hard hats, workers from harm reduction in Hamilton, Ontario. Construction Safety Week audience recently.

Hamilton-Halton Construction Association (HHCA) Executive Director Sue Ramsay told members that on March 1, the Ontario Legislative Assembly passed the Labor for Workers Act, implementing a new mandate for the construction industry to “reduce the risk of death from opioid overdoses in the workplace”. requiring employers to provide a naloxone kit in workplaces where overdoses are a potential hazard.

This is clearly targeting construction employers, Ramsay said.

“Mental health and addiction are real concerns in our industry. As employers, we must do everything we can to support and protect our workers,” she noted, referring to the legislation.

“Obviously, these are really complex issues, best explained by experts.”

Ramsay enlisted two regional harm reduction officers from The Aids Network, Tess Hopkins and Marijo Watt, to provide context and practical advice to HHCA members as part of the May 5 session titled Naloxone and Harm Reduction 101. Each table had two small pouches, one with needles, syringes and vials of naloxone and one with a nasal application.

DON WALL — Tess Hopkins (right) and Marijo Watt, harm reduction workers from The Aids Network, speak to an audience at the Hamilton-Halton Construction Association about the province’s new naloxone policy.

Workers explained that nasal sprays are part of a new phase of apps that will likely replace needles eventually.

The case for harm reduction with naloxone kits in the construction industry is strong, Hopkins said, noting research from 2020 indicating that of the nearly 2,500 reported opioid-related deaths in the province, 30 % were construction workers.

The Other Pandemic campaign, launched by the Ontario Construction Consortium in partnership with the Ontario Harm Reduction Network in 2021, urged unions and contractors to increase training and education on opioids.

“You have the Ontario Construction Consortium talking about secure supply. It’s not something that I thought was in the realm of possibility two years ago, three years ago,” Hopkins said.

It’s become a “perfect storm” over the past two years, the HHCA audience has been told – a flood of “toxic” and impure opioids that hit the streets during the pandemic, healthcare workers construction continuing to be overrepresented among opioid users, and now with labor shortages, the pressure is greater than ever for workers to find a way to overcome chronic pain.

“Wherever you go there is a critical shortage of workers and pressure to return to work,” Watt said. “One in three construction workers in the country, unionized or non-unionized, has reported problematic substance use. It does not distinguish between alcohol and drugs. But this figure is alarming. You can prevent people from dying just by having naloxone available. »

Examples of opioids are heroin, fentanyl, oxycodone, hydrocodone, codeine and morphine, Hopkins explained. Fentanyl is 100 times stronger than morphine and is often mixed with other opioids, fentanyl analogues or different types of depressants.

Carfentanil is a fentanyl derivative and 10,000 times stronger than morphine.

Law enforcement, including major drug busts, forces street vendors to mix products depending on availability, with benzodiazepines, a class of depressants, which are often part of the mix these days, a explained Hopkins.

“People have no idea what they’re putting in their bodies,” she said. “People who use substances die accidentally, they are poisoned to death by a toxic and unpredictable drug supply.”

Watt added: “It’s almost impossible to get more pure drugs. Especially as seen throughout COVID with border closures, people don’t know what’s in their medications.

“So we’re trying to get naloxone into everyone’s hands. Because if you don’t have it, you risk an overdose if you use drugs.

Naloxone is a drug that reverses an opioid overdose. It restores a person’s normal breathing if their breathing has slowed or stopped due to an opioid overdose, which takes about two to five minutes to work and lasts between 30 and 90 minutes in the blood.

If naloxone is given to someone who does not have opioids in their system, it has no effect and causes no harm.

Ramsay noted that although the legislation has been passed, the specific regulations mandating naloxone kits in the construction sector have not been proclaimed, with regulators giving the industry time to adapt.

Meanwhile, Hopkins said, companies should train staff to recognize when kits should be used as part of an inclusive and supportive work environment.

And right now, she says, employers should get their hands on naloxone kits — start by looking for the Ontario harm reduction distribution program locator, contact local harm reduction outreach or inquire you at pharmacies. Kits are free.

Follow the author on Twitter @DonWall_DCN.

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Charleston First Tee Program Received $150,000 | Sports https://masterdiver.net/charleston-first-tee-program-received-150000-sports/ Sat, 07 May 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://masterdiver.net/charleston-first-tee-program-received-150000-sports/ Most of us can only imagine what we would do if we received a substantial financial gift. Bucky Dudley, executive director of First Tee of Greater Charleston, said a $150,000 gift the organization recently received from Ryan Hanks and Madison Capital Group is “transformative.” “Ryan and Madison Capital have been supporters for a while and […]]]>

Most of us can only imagine what we would do if we received a substantial financial gift. Bucky Dudley, executive director of First Tee of Greater Charleston, said a $150,000 gift the organization recently received from Ryan Hanks and Madison Capital Group is “transformative.”

“Ryan and Madison Capital have been supporters for a while and have really raised the bar. We are so excited to have him invest in us and believe in our mission, the impact we have on the kids in the community,” said Dudley, adding that this is the largest donation ever made to the Charleston First Tee program.

“It will allow us to expand access and expand our reach. Charleston is growing so much, and it will allow us to reach more kids, increase things like transportation and coach training, and even launching new programs to support our children in the community.”

First Tee employs a life skills program that develops “the values ​​found in the game of golf, including honesty, integrity, perseverance and respect”. The First Tee of Greater Charleston started in 2008 and now has 150 volunteers as coaches and mentors. In 2021, more than 17,000 young people from Charleston, Berkeley and Dorchester counties participated in the First Tee of Greater Charleston at golf courses, schools and through youth-serving agencies.

Hanks is the founder/CEO of Charlotte-based Madison Capital Group and a part-time resident of Lowcountry. Madison Capital (madisoncap.com) is focused on acquiring, developing and managing multi-family suburban garden-style communities in the Southeast and Southwest, self-storage facilities nationwide as well as boat and RV storage acquisition and development opportunities across the Southeast.

Dudley said the organization has received donations that over time have exceeded the $150,000 donation from Hanks and Madison Capital, but this is the largest single contribution.

“We received a gift from a donor that we were trying to get a match for. We contacted Ryan about this matching gift and he said, ‘Set me up. I’m in.’ And when the gift came it was $150,000. It was really exciting,” Dudley said. “We hope a gift, an investment like this, will encourage other leaders to support local non-profits like First Tee. There are so many local nonprofits doing good work in the community. We wanted it out there and hopefully other local business leaders will want to get involved and support nonprofits as well.”

In a press release announcing the donation, Hanks said, “We are thrilled to invest in this wonderful organization. Their work is inspiring and will have a generational impact on children and families in the Greater Charleston community for years to come. We invite others to join us in advancing First Tee’s mission to empower children and adolescents.

Game Changers is an initiative recently implemented by First Tee of Greater Charleston and a YouTube video is available at https://youtu.be/7O7hW1FpNYk. Dudley said the giveaway will help Game Changers continue and grow.

“We take a deep dive into our underserved, needs-based community, which we have always done through schools and outreach partnerships,” Dudley said. “We are still at the beginning. We started with 6th graders and now 7th graders. We will stay with these children until they graduate.”

Dudley said his own son had just started at First Tee, and every time he steps off the golf course, Dudley asks his son for the word of the day.

“He says ‘It’s the responsibility.’ So I ask him what that means to him. Having a parent involved really helps anchor our character upbringing, the core values ​​that we teach,” Dudley said. “It’s cool if they become golfers for life. If they don’t, they walk away with the core values ​​and character workouts that the program is built on. Golf is just a way to ‘get there.”

Call 843-864-4200 or visit firstteechs.org to learn more about First Tee of Greater Charleston and its programs.

Coming

• May 16: East Cooper Habitat for Humanity Golf Tees to House Keys Tournament, Charleston National Golf Club, $150 per player, $500 per team, tour eastcooperhabitat.orgcall Christine Pinson at 843-881-2600 or email christine@eastcooperhabitat.org.

ace

Jim Mackey, March 21, Bulls Bay Golf Club, No. 12, 144 yards, 9-iron. Witnesses: Jim Ihrke, Mark Osborn, Jule Smith.

Jim Royston, April 15, Cassique-Kiawah Island Club, #16, 122 yards, 8-iron. Witnesses: Ray Buehler, Bob Wright.

Mike Bright, April 18, Bulls Bay Golf Club, No. 12, 132 yards, 8-iron. Witnesses: Bill Crawford, Bill Longfield, Bill Rogers.

Rob McKee, April 19, Dunes West Golf & River Club, No. 17, 155 yards, 9-iron. Witnesses: Peter Frandeschi, John Ticknor, Spencer Turner.

Barbara Walch, April 20, Links at Stono Ferry, #14, 65 yards, pitching wedge. Witnesses: Matt Bell, Trent Barthelmas, Justin Smoak.

Christopher Lucas, April 22, Charleston Municipal Golf Course, No. 14, 111 yards, 50 degree corner. Witness: Seth Barnes.

John Brandon, April 24, Crooked Oaks-Seabrook Island Club, No. 5, 117 yards, 9 wood. Witness: Joe Collins.

Chris Clemins, April 24, Dunes West Golf & River Club, No. 6, 138 yards, 9-iron. Witnesses: Jerad Shaffer, Brian Sawyer, Cody Ward.

Jim Barr, April 26, Legend Oaks Golf Club, No. 8, 100 yards, 7 iron. Witnesses: Noel Rogers, Jim Machtel, Dennis Wolenski.

Diane Eberhard, April 26, Crooked Oaks-Seabrook Island Club, No. 9, 120 yards, 27-degree hybrid. Witness: Misty Wise.

John Murray, April 27, Links at Stono Ferry, No. 14, 62 yards, 9 iron. Witnesses: Jane Verdeck, Susan Shoemaker.

Larry Siupa, April 27, Dunes West Golf & River Club, No. 6, 127 yards, 8-iron. Witnesses: Brent Reeves, Sam Reynold.

Rick Pohlman, May 2, Charleston National Golf Club, No. 14, 112 yards, gap wedge. Witnesses: Kurt Nendorf, Ed McFadden.

A hole-in-one must be marked by the golf course. Please email braswellsports@hotmail.com and sportsdesk@postandcourier.com.

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Piloting a remote-controlled vehicle from shore paves the way for deep-sea exploration https://masterdiver.net/piloting-a-remote-controlled-vehicle-from-shore-paves-the-way-for-deep-sea-exploration/ Thu, 05 May 2022 17:16:24 +0000 https://masterdiver.net/piloting-a-remote-controlled-vehicle-from-shore-paves-the-way-for-deep-sea-exploration/ During a recent expedition on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration ship Okeanos Explorer, an engineer ashore, more than 1,000 miles from the ship, successfully piloted a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to explore the deep ocean. A first for NOAA Ocean Exploration and the Global Foundation for Ocean Exploration, this test of piloting an ROV […]]]>

During a recent expedition on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration ship Okeanos Explorer, an engineer ashore, more than 1,000 miles from the ship, successfully piloted a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to explore the deep ocean. A first for NOAA Ocean Exploration and the Global Foundation for Ocean Exploration, this test of piloting an ROV from shore opens up new possibilities for deep sea exploration.

“Telepresence technology has been a game-changer for deep sea exploration,” NOAA officials said. “It changed who could participate, and when, how and from where they could do it. First, we used it to engage scientists from shore in real time, then we used it to invite the public to explore the depths of the ocean, and finally we used it to carry out mapping operations from the shore.

On March 1, 2022, during the NOAA Ocean Exploration ROV 2022 and Mapping Shakedown on the NOAA vessel Okeanos Explorerall the other objectives having been achieved, the engineers of the Global Foundation for Ocean Engineering (GFOE) have looked into a new use for telepresence: piloting a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) deep discoverer from the shore. From Rhode Island, more specifically, about 2,575 kilometers (1,600 miles) from the ROV in the depths of the Florida Straits.

During the test, an onshore GFOE engineer piloted the ROV for more than an hour of typical exploration activity over a boulder field in an uncharted canyon on the West Florida Plateau. The test required a coordinated effort between the pilot ashore and the onboard team of ROV engineers, officers and scientists to determine and control the vessel’s movements and the functions of the ROV’s camera and manipulator arm. necessary for imaging and geological sampling typically done during a dive.

“The ability to fly the ROV from a shore-based location is the result of a very talented team of engineers who worked together to overcome the multiple challenges necessary to make this possible,” said GFOE President Dave Lovalvo. “GFOE is excited about the development of this capability and continues to advance our technology in deep sea robotics.”

Previous efforts to improve telepresence capabilities on board Okeanos Explorer resulted in a significant reduction in communication delay between ship and shore. During the recent test, the shore engineer was able to initiate ROV movements and actions (e.g. imaging and sampling) from shore and see the ROV’s response in the live streamed video, taken 1,800 meters (5,906 feet) underwater, in just 1.25 seconds. This is remarkable given that signals must travel approximately 70,811 kilometers (44,000 miles) to a satellite in space and then back to Earth, twice (action input and video response).

“As the nation’s leader in ocean exploration, NOAA Ocean Exploration has a responsibility to push the boundaries of what is possible for deep sea exploration,” said Jeremy Weirich, director of NOAA Ocean Exploration. “Our future depends on the ocean, and new and evolving technologies are essential to help us better understand it, protect it and manage its many uses. The ability to fly an ROV from shore holds great promise and is just one of many technological advancements we have supported through partnerships with organizations like GFOE.

The March test was only the second test of this evolving capability, and the first the partners have tested in the deep ocean. The GFOE first tested its piloting capability ashore in Yellowstone National Park’s Yellowstone Lake in August 2021, a collaboration between NOAA’s Office of Marine and Aviation Operations and the GFOE. During the Yellowstone trials, GFOE piloted its ROV Yogi from shore in Rhode Island and also developed the ability to operate its research vessel Anne in autonomous mode, allowing the vessel to automatically follow Yogi during a dive.

Ocean exploration has relied on the use of ROVs for over 30 years. But the way NOAA operates them hasn’t changed much. For example, during ROV operations conducted by NOAA Ocean Exploration and GFOE on Okeanos Exploreron-board engineers, who are required to operate and maintain the ROV and related systems, typically make up a relatively large percentage of the science team.

After years of telepresence upgrades and technology and personnel development, the successful demonstration of onshore ROV piloting is a significant achievement that has broad implications for the future of deep sea exploration.

Piloting ROVs ashore provides opportunities for engineers ashore who might not be able to go to sea and for training new ROV engineers. It also provides redundancy in case of emergency and can potentially free up valuable berths to expand science teams in new directions.

NOAA Ocean Exploration is the only federal program dedicated to deep ocean exploration. By leading national efforts to explore the world’s oceans and making ocean exploration more accessible, NOAA Ocean Exploration fills gaps in basic understanding of America’s deep waters and seafloor, providing data, information and essential awareness about the deep ocean needed to sustain and accelerate the economy, health, and security of the United States.

The Global Foundation for Ocean Exploration (GFOE) is a not-for-profit foundation whose primary mission is to develop the capabilities and foster the relationships necessary to be a global presence in the world of ocean exploration. GFOE strives to empower the underwater science community with the tools and expertise to explore the deepest depths of the largest and deepest bodies of water on the planet and trains the workforce to ocean exploration.

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