Dive Program – Master Diver http://masterdiver.net/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 10:39:53 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://masterdiver.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2-e1624424277963-150x150.png Dive Program – Master Diver http://masterdiver.net/ 32 32 How Using Building Information Modeling Makes Things Better https://masterdiver.net/how-using-building-information-modeling-makes-things-better/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 09:06:40 +0000 https://masterdiver.net/how-using-building-information-modeling-makes-things-better/ The science of engineering appeals to me for many reasons. I like solving problems. I like to create. I like to look at the glass half full and wonder if a smaller glass would be more effective. I’m not as interested in counting things. I realized this at the start of my career. Three or […]]]>

The science of engineering appeals to me for many reasons. I like solving problems. I like to create. I like to look at the glass half full and wonder if a smaller glass would be more effective.

I’m not as interested in counting things.

I realized this at the start of my career. Three or four years after graduating from engineering, one of the first jobs I was given at Duke Energy was to count the nuts, bolts and washers in the design we just completed for a new sub -station. They handed me a stack of drawings and said, “Here.”

I was like, “I’m a professional engineer, right? I finished my degree and I am an engineer. And I count the nuts, bolts and washers to make sure we have the right numbers in the field.

I also thought, “This is not the way to go.” So I took a 3D modeling course for Autodesk’s Inventor design software. And the eureka moment happened. Use the program, put the information in the model and it automatically updates your building materials. No more counting nuts, bolts and washers.

That moment ignited the fire that propelled my decades-long career in engineering design. Understanding the software led me to work with others at Duke to develop specifications and processes to help people design the utility assets and rebuilds we needed. We have succeeded in transforming our existing solid standards into intelligent modelling.

Over the years, my former team and other utility engineers have kept pace with changing technology. Together we developed the Substation Design Suite software in collaboration with Autodesk and Automation Force. We have also formed a community called the Substation Design Solution Industry Consortium (SDSIC), composed of member utilities and contract design and engineering companies that have adopted, or are studying for adoption, leading technology software platforms with these software developers.

The consortium establishes common workflows and toolkit functionality, shares libraries and standards, and discusses technology needs and other topics that help vendors develop software to an industry standard. Our motto, “Design, Integrate, Automate”, reflects our commitment to establishing standards to promote the development of common libraries from internal resources, external partners and/or equipment manufacturers.

Thanks to SDSIC and BIM users around the world, the technology I was eager to learn years ago has become more than just a way to eliminate repetitive design tasks. Utilities are now implementing processes based on a single source of accurate information, connected to an intelligent 3D digital model that everyone in their organization can use to do their job, wherever they are in the process.

Yet, despite all these advances BIM has made in terms of efficiency and accuracy, many substation engineers still use 2D tools for design. There are persistent barriers to the adoption of this technology. For BIM champions looking to advance their organization’s design operations, the struggle is real.

Objections that BIM champions often face include:

  • Is BIM worth it?
  • How are we going to pay it?
  • How do we teach staff to use new technologies while doing their “day job”?

I’m so committed to the value of intelligent design that I worked with BIM subject matter experts to write a guide to help utility staff persuade decision makers. It’s called the “Convincing Your Boss” Toolkit. If you are looking for evidence to help you justify and drive a BIM transition in your utility, download our eBook. If you’re facing a problem that the guide didn’t solve, let’s connect. I would be happy to help you. You can reach me at [email protected]

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Hogs Split against Alligators and Sharks https://masterdiver.net/hogs-split-against-alligators-and-sharks/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 21:03:57 +0000 https://masterdiver.net/hogs-split-against-alligators-and-sharks/ Branford clay September 23, 2022 GAINESVILLE, Florida – The Arkansas swim and dive team split the day, with a win over Nova Southeastern and a loss to the Florida Gators. Against the Gators, the Hogs posted a team score of 79 to Florida’s 219 and 222 to the Sharks’ 65. Arkansas is now 2-1 this […]]]>


GAINESVILLE, Florida – The Arkansas swim and dive team split the day, with a win over Nova Southeastern and a loss to the Florida Gators.

Against the Gators, the Hogs posted a team score of 79 to Florida’s 219 and 222 to the Sharks’ 65. Arkansas is now 2-1 this season.

“I think the team did a great job today against a Florida team that will probably be one of the top 5 teams in the NCAA all year. We competed well on the road and I think we showed positive progression from where we were at the competition last week,” said head coach Neil Harper. “The swimmers and divers are working hard right now and we are showing improvement and a dedication to working towards our goals for the rest of this fall!”

Pork Highlights

  • Graduate student Luciana Thomas scored her first victory in the 200m butterfly.
  • The Razorbacks totaled five second-place finishes.
  • Junior Grace Walker finished second in the three-metre dive and third in the one-metre springboard.

Next
Arkansas returns home to host Alabama at 12 p.m. CT on Friday, Sept. 30 at the Arkansas Natatorium.

More information
Keep up to date with all the latest news and information and get a behind-the-scenes look at our program on social media. Follow us on Twitter at @RazorbackSD and check out our Facebook page. Stats, news and athlete information can be found at ArkansasRazorbacks.com.

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Ask Stew: How much time should I dedicate to training? https://masterdiver.net/ask-stew-how-much-time-should-i-dedicate-to-training/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 23:28:30 +0000 https://masterdiver.net/ask-stew-how-much-time-should-i-dedicate-to-training/ How much do you need to prepare for a military physical fitness test? It depends on the job, qualification, military occupational specialty or Air Force specialty code you want. Your athletic history and pre-military training habits will determine how long each day you will need to train before joining. Here is a question from an […]]]>

How much do you need to prepare for a military physical fitness test? It depends on the job, qualification, military occupational specialty or Air Force specialty code you want. Your athletic history and pre-military training habits will determine how long each day you will need to train before joining.

Here is a question from an active duty Navy NCO who is looking to enter the Navy diving community:

Stew, how many hours per week would you say your students spend on your programs? What about including things like recovery and mobility work? I am an active duty marine [sailor] trying to make sure I give 100% as I prepare for the Dive community. Thank you ST

ST, as with any program, your first goal is to remove any weaknesses you may have. The #1 factor that will determine your acceptance into the diving community is your performance on the Navy Physical Screening Test (PST).

If you don’t master the PST, you may never have the opportunity to change rates and go to dive school. The good news is that PST level training doesn’t take a lot of time, and in as little as an hour a day you can do workouts that specifically focus on running and swimming faster, as well as high repetition gym exercises. Obviously, this hour is in addition to any physical activity in your normal workday.

The second weakness that many people have is a lack of water confidence. Swimming in general, swimming in place, swimming underwater and learning to breathe underwater with scuba gear is not easy. Getting in the water almost every day will help you become more confident. Learn more about overstitching and practice it seriously, as most people consider it easy before trying it. Poor stride performance is responsible for more failures than any other skill in scuba school prep courses.

Of course, finding the time for this daily effort will require a well-thought-out recovery plan. Having a day or two in the week when you can just focus on flexibility, mobility and pool skills like walking and drowning protection will go a long way in helping you recover from tough workouts while learning valuable swimming skills. swimming pool.

To answer your question, I recommend a mid-week and weekend mobility day that looks like this:

Repeat 5 times

  • Swimming or other non-impact cardio: 5 minutes
  • Stretch, foam roller or massage: 5 minutes

If you have more time, tread water for 5-10 minutes with no hands and follow up with some of the pool techniques you’ll see in Preparation for diving and diving school like drowning protection and underwater swimming. Never do this training alone.

Here are more training ideas for pre-dive school.

After each daily workout, dedicate 15-20 minutes to these recovery, mobility, and flexibility exercises, and you’ll be in a better recovery position before or after a long day at work.

The total time spent training each day depends on your sport history, your current physical condition and your future goals. If you’re considering programs like diving and special ops, you’ll need to devote time to swimming in addition to running, calisthenics, and weight training. It can take 90-120 minutes a day.

If you are looking for a career as an Army Ranger or in the Special Forces, the need for swimming is reduced to zero. You only need to ruck on leg days (2-3 times per week), while swimming should be done daily if you are not a swim athlete and need more time in the pool. ‘water.

If you are considering a conventional military profession, your athletic background may suffice with as little as 30 minutes of specific test training each week to pass basic training and follow-up military schools.

One thing is certain: there is no 30-minute indoor workout that will prepare you for specialized training like diving school or other special ops training, so taking the time to overcome your weaknesses is the key. ultimate goal of your success. Remember that as you work harder, the need for recovery days will also increase.

– Stew Smith is a former Navy SEAL and fitness author Certified as a Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) with the National Strength and Conditioning Association. Visit her Fitness e-book store if you are looking to start a workout program to create a healthy lifestyle. Send your fitness questions to stew@stewsmith.com.

Want to learn more about military life?

Whether you’re considering joining the military, looking for basic fitness and training tips, or keeping up with military life and benefits, Military.com has you covered. Subscribe to Military.com to receive military news, updates and resources straight to your inbox.

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Researchers dive for kelp in the Arctic https://masterdiver.net/researchers-dive-for-kelp-in-the-arctic/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 23:06:18 +0000 https://masterdiver.net/researchers-dive-for-kelp-in-the-arctic/ Divers wrap up an expedition in Cambridge Bay, Nunavut, after weeks of studying algal biodiversity. This is an area that has rarely been studied. Over the past few weeks, researchers have worked to track and understand the effects of climate change on algae along coastal waters in the western Canadian Arctic. They also hoped to […]]]>

Divers wrap up an expedition in Cambridge Bay, Nunavut, after weeks of studying algal biodiversity.

This is an area that has rarely been studied.

Over the past few weeks, researchers have worked to track and understand the effects of climate change on algae along coastal waters in the western Canadian Arctic. They also hoped to map and study the ecology of arctic kelp forests in the region.

Dr. Amanda Savoie, who leads the project, spoke to CBC a few weeks into the trip.

“There’s kind of an idea that there aren’t really any kelp forests here and there isn’t as much seaweed. And so we’re kind of looking to see if that’s true,” Savoie said.

Savoie is a research scientist at the Ottawa Museum of Nature and director of the Center for Arctic Knowledge and Exploration.

Amanda Savoie harvests kelp on her research trip to Cambridge Bay. (Roger Bull/Canadian Museum of Nature)

Ocean temperatures play a big role in algae growth around the world, Savoie said. As waters warm, the distribution of different species of algae changes. The Arctic and Antarctica are expected to be the hardest hit, because once those waters warm, there will be nowhere colder for the algae to go.

“We know the species composition will change and Arctic kelp will have nowhere to go when the water gets too warm. But more kelp will come up from the south,” Savoie explained.

“We’re really trying to understand what’s going on right now so that if things change in the future, we’ll have a baseline to come back to for this area.”

Map an underwater forest

She is joined in the research program by a team of scientists affiliated with the ArcticNet-funded project. ArcticKelp with Laval University and Fisheries and Oceans Canada. So far, the ArcticKelp project has studied and mapped kelp forests in the Eastern Arctic and this partnership will extend the knowledge to the Western Arctic.

Savoie traveled to Cambridge Bay this spring to meet with community members and the local hunters and trappers organization, where she learned that some community members are interested in seaweed as a food source. She said local knowledge was crucial in finding dive sites.

“We have a local guide who takes us scuba diving on his boat and without him this study wouldn’t happen. He’s so important to our work,” she said.

John Lyall of Cambridge Bay showed the searchers some good dive spots. (Matisse Harvey/Radio Canada)

“I think people are interested in knowing what we find in the general marine environment around Cambridge Bay – if there is any potential for kelp harvesting in that area.”

Because the tides are smaller there, researchers have to dive to access the algae.

“We actually brought kelp for the elders to try…and they loved it. It was a really cool experience,” Savoie said.

John Lyall, their local guide in Cambridge Bay, regularly guides tourists and divers out on the water.

He said it creates an exchange of knowledge – he helps them, and in turn he sometimes finds new places to dive or learn more about the land.

“It’s really cool,” he said. “I’m just happy that they involve us ordinary people [as] guides.”

A “baseline” for future Arctic kelp research

There are an estimated 175 known species of algae in the Canadian Arctic. The most recent taxonomic study dates back more than four decades from the work of museum researcher RKS Lee. Arctic specimens collected from Lee’s work in the 1960s and 1970s number in the hundreds and are housed in the museum’s National Herbarium of Canada in Gatineau, Quebec.

Savoie and his colleagues hope to add to this collection and will collect and identify algal species as well as DNA data.

Amanda Savoie leads a research project in Cambridge Bay to study arctic algae. (Matisse Harvey/Radio Canada)

“I’m going to sequence the things I collect from the museum to compare their DNA basically to other seed collections from the Arctic, Atlantic and Pacific,” she said.

Savoie said there is evidence of kelp, but scientists have yet to observe a true kelp forest. These habitats resemble tropical rainforests – hotspots for biodiversity, hosting other algae and providing food and shelter for fish and invertebrates.

“We found kelp, which is really exciting. So there’s definitely kelp here.”

The multi-year program began in August and ends on Tuesday. Savoie said she hopes to return next year.

“With this baseline, we will be able to compare and see the change. We don’t know what the Arctic will look like in 20 or 30 years, and I think it could be very different from what we see now. .”

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Razorbacks win at Little Rock https://masterdiver.net/razorbacks-win-at-little-rock/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 22:32:42 +0000 https://masterdiver.net/razorbacks-win-at-little-rock/ Branford clay September 17, 2022 LITTLE STONEark. – Arkansas had a great start to the season at the Arkansas Invitational on Saturday and posted a team score of 674 to win the seven-team encounter. Other Arkansas Invite teams included Henderson State, Ouachita Baptist, University of the Ozarks, William Baptist University, Hendrix College, and the Harding […]]]>


LITTLE STONEark. – Arkansas had a great start to the season at the Arkansas Invitational on Saturday and posted a team score of 674 to win the seven-team encounter. Other Arkansas Invite teams included Henderson State, Ouachita Baptist, University of the Ozarks, William Baptist University, Hendrix College, and the Harding University Club swim team.

The Razorbacks have 13 wins in the Arkansas Invitational.

“I am very satisfied with the performance of the team. It’s a great way to start the season against all the other college teams at Arkansas State,” said head coach Neil Harper. “I think our freshmen did really well, and we were led by our seniors and senior grads as well!”

Senior Regan Caufield swept the diving events with victories in the one-meter and three-meter dives.

“Regan did a great job today. I’m really proud of her and looking forward to the big one of the year,” said diving coach Abel Sanchez.

Pork Highlights

  • Arkansas held six events where there was a first, second and third place finish.
  • The Hogs placed first in all three relays, which included the 200 IM relay, 400 freestyle relay and 200 freestyle relay.
  • Transfer graduate Luciana Thomas has won several victories, in the 500m freestyle and 200 medley relay events.

More information
Keep up to date with all the latest news and information and get a behind-the-scenes look at our program on social media. Follow us on Twitter at @RazorbackSD and check out our Facebook page. Stats, news and athlete information can be found at ArkansasRazorbacks.com.

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Exchange program immerses Japanese student in Durango culture – The Durango Herald https://masterdiver.net/exchange-program-immerses-japanese-student-in-durango-culture-the-durango-herald/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 11:00:14 +0000 https://masterdiver.net/exchange-program-immerses-japanese-student-in-durango-culture-the-durango-herald/ The Animas high school welcomes two to three foreign students each year Aoi Yamagishi, right, sits next to her foster brother, Tucker Owens, as Tucker’s mother, Lisa Owens, helps Animas High School students with homework Wednesday at their La Plata County home. (Jerry McBride/Durango Herald) For Lisa Owens, Durango resident and single mother, raising a […]]]>

The Animas high school welcomes two to three foreign students each year

Aoi Yamagishi, right, sits next to her foster brother, Tucker Owens, as Tucker’s mother, Lisa Owens, helps Animas High School students with homework Wednesday at their La Plata County home. (Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)

For Lisa Owens, Durango resident and single mother, raising a child has been the most fulfilling part of her life. When the opportunity arose to open her arms to another child and be a foster mother to an exchange student visiting from another country, she took it.

Four years ago, she welcomed into her home a child from Japan named Aoi Yamagishi, then only 12 years old. This year, Aoi returned, now 16 and eager to tackle everything that comes with attending an American high school.

Aoi is part of the Lex-Hippo Family Club, a Japan-based institute that sends young children to live from a few weeks to a year in other countries to fully immerse themselves in their language. Aoi has been a member of Lex-Hippo for five years and said many children join the organization to learn one or more of the 22 languages ​​taught in the classrooms.

Lex-Hippo works with many exchange programs like the USA 4-H International Exchange Programs, a non-profit organization that has been in service for 50 years and has worked with over 63,000 young people in 43 countries since 1972.

In 2018, 4-H International sent flyers to parents in Durango in hopes of sparking interest in being a host family for an exchange student, and Owens jumped at the chance.

“I thought, ‘Why not?'” Owens said. “I wanted to make a difference.”

The 12-year-old Japanese boy she took into her home, however, did not speak a word of English.

“I didn’t expect that,” Owens said. “It was hard.”

“I didn’t understand anything for the first two weeks,” Aoi said.

“There were a lot of hand gestures,” Owens’ 16-year-old son Tucker said. “A lot of pointing at things.”

“I was doing a lot of guessing back then,” Aoi said. “I would try to read people. Guess what they wanted or said, but then I just started figuring things out here and there.

Aoi stayed for four weeks when he first visited the United States, then realized he wanted to come back.

“I live in Tokyo, in a city,” he said, “but I liked being in the countryside (Durango).”

At 16, Aoi decided to return for her entire first year to live with her former foster family.

“I think he missed my cooking,” Owens said with a wink.

Lisa Owens prepares lunches Wednesday for her son, Tucker Owens, left, and international student Aoi Yamagishi, while they do their homework. This is the second time the Owens have hosted Aoi. Lisa Owens joked that he came back from Japan for his cooking. (Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)

Besides Owens’ cooking, the stark contrast between Animas High School, a public charter with a project-based curriculum that has two to three exchange students each year, and the type of school Aoi attends in Tokyo is a stark contrast. another reason he had for crossing the ocean and spending a school year in the United States

“We went rafting my first day of school,” he said with a smile. “I feel more equal here. They give you the opportunity to discuss things. To express your opinions. It’s a good school. In Japanese schools, there are not many discussions. There is a one-sided lesson. When they teach English, it’s just reading and writing. You can’t speak it.

“Aoi just got into everything we offer here,” said Libby Cowles, dean of enrollment and vice-principal of the school at AHS. “He’s been very positive.”

Other cultural differences Aoi has noted while attending AHS are the differences between American and Japanese student lunches, the fact that students are allowed to snack and drink water in a hall. in class and to be able to use the toilet when they have to go.

“You can’t go to the bathroom in a Japanese class,” he said, shaking his head. “We have to wait until the end of the course.”

Whether Aoi decides to complete his post-secondary education in the United States or stay in Japan after his junior year is over, he knows he wants to enter a kind of nature-based architecture that is very different from Tokyo’s building structures. to which he is accustomed. He is also interested in international relations and a job that allows him to continue to travel around the world. Oh, and maybe climb Mount Kilimanjaro with his host family one day.

“We all want to go to Africa together,” Tucker said. “That would be so much fun!”

Tucker Owens and Aoi Yamagishi are all smiles sitting next to each other at Animas High School. The two plan to go on an African adventure together in the near future. (Megan K. Olsen/Durango Herald)

Aoi Yamagishi sits next to his foster brother, Tucker Owens, in a classroom at Animas High School. (Megan K. Olsen/Durango Herald)

Following the strict rules of the Lex-Hippo program, Aoi is not allowed to have any contact with his family in Japan for the duration of his stay in Durango. Although Owens thinks such a policy is too strict, Aoi understands how Lex-Hippo operates.

“When I’m here, I have to be here fully,” he said. “I miss my family, but I have family here. I just like talking with them (host family). It’s not special, but it’s good for me.

Aoi loves the United States as much as her host family.

“I’ve lived in Tokyo all my life,” he said. “It’s very different. America is a good country. It’s very free.

Owens went on to point out that more Durango parents, and more Americans, should consider the possibility of being a host family for an exchange student, even if there is no monetary incentive.

“Open your home and open your heart,” she said. “Dive in. Be open and tolerant. I feel like I’m making a difference in Aoi’s life, and it’s worth it.

molsen@durangoherald.com

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ASU vs. Eastern Michigan Preview https://masterdiver.net/asu-vs-eastern-michigan-preview/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 05:55:00 +0000 https://masterdiver.net/asu-vs-eastern-michigan-preview/ (3TV/CBS 5) — It was a disappointing defeat marked by old habits. But was it so encouraging? We discuss ASU’s loss of route to Oklahoma State before turning our attention to the front. We’re going behind the Eastern Michigan lines with an Eagles insider Zack Vannieuwenhze (37:33) before previewing Saturday’s game, with our keys to […]]]>

(3TV/CBS 5) — It was a disappointing defeat marked by old habits. But was it so encouraging? We discuss ASU’s loss of route to Oklahoma State before turning our attention to the front. We’re going behind the Eastern Michigan lines with an Eagles insider Zack Vannieuwenhze (37:33) before previewing Saturday’s game, with our keys to victory and final score predictions.

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RECENT EPISODES

ASU vs. Oklahoma State Preview: After previewing ASU’s victory over NAU, we chat with ASU kicker Carter Brown and preview the road trip to Stillwater.

Tim Healey looks back on 25 seasons as The Voice of the Sun Devils: The beloved play-by-play broadcaster joins us to discuss his career, behind-the-scenes work and what he expects from the Sun Devils in 2022.

ASU vs. NAU Preview: ASU FOOTBALL IS BACK! We go behind the Lumberjack lines with NAU broadcaster Mitch Strohman (8:27) and dive deep into the Sun Devils’ season opener, including our game predictions.

Season overview and predictions: We discuss the upcoming season and make our fearless predictions with Hod Rabino and Cole Topham from DevilsDigest.com

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Fall Camp Update: We break down the latest camp developments and discuss how key position battles are going. Plus, we speak with first-year defensive tackle Robby Harrison

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Fall Camp Preview: We break down key positional battles and highlight critical storylines to follow as the Sun Devils open up fall camp.

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Mailbag, Softball Misfortunes, and More: We answer questions from listeners, talk softball with Brady Vernon, and chat with ASU DL Jalil Rivera-Harvey and NAU head football coach Chris Ball.

Stone Cole’s year in review: Bah bah, king! It’s Sparky’s music! In honor of our 316th episode, we’re taking a Stone Cold-themed look back at the year that has been dedicated to Sun Devil sports. There were a lot of things that made us say “Hell yeah!” and many that provoked a “What?!”

A positive momentum: We break some good news and chat with new WR Cam Johnson.

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Valley manages United to quickly take control of EOAC | News, Sports, Jobs https://masterdiver.net/valley-manages-united-to-quickly-take-control-of-eoac-news-sports-jobs/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 05:20:39 +0000 https://masterdiver.net/valley-manages-united-to-quickly-take-control-of-eoac-news-sports-jobs/ CAMPBELL — Week one of league play in the Eastern Ohio Athletic Conference featured a huge clash between two of the league’s top title contenders. The Eagles battle saw the Valley Christian Eagles take an early advantage in the conference race with a 36-17 win over United at Knapick Field on Saturday night. […]]]>

CAMPBELL — Week one of league play in the Eastern Ohio Athletic Conference featured a huge clash between two of the league’s top title contenders.

The Eagles battle saw the Valley Christian Eagles take an early advantage in the conference race with a 36-17 win over United at Knapick Field on Saturday night.

Valley’s win keeps them unbeaten this season at 4-0 on aggregate and 1-0 in the EOAC. United suffered their first defeat to fall to 3-1 and 0-1 in the league.

“From the start of being here last year until now, the kids have really bought into it,” said valley coach Andy Hake. “I can’t say enough about them (United), but it’s a great way to start the league 1-0. We have a lot of testing left (this season), and we’ll enjoy that one. here tonight and come back tomorrow.

The contest was a hard-hitting affair with Valley taking control of the contest in the second half with a 1-yard run from Ja’Sean Lindsey on the first possession of the second half to increase their advantage to 28-10 at the 8:05 mark of the third quarter.

“We just had to take more back and start working harder,” Lindsey commented on the conversations at halftime. “It’s a huge win for us. We can win the conference with this huge win. It was a big one.

“They played physical for 48 minutes” said United manager DJ Ogilvie. “They matched our physique tonight, and that was the difference.”

Then it was Valley’s defense that stole the show when junior Marquez Gibson picked up a fumble from United and ran 42 yards for a touchdown and increased the lead to 36-10 with 7:34 remaining in the third frame. The fumble return for a touchdown was Gibson’s second in the past two games.

United added a 32-yard touchdown pass from Luke Courtney to Hayden Castro on the first play of the fourth quarter to cut the deficit to the final score of 36-17. United appeared to have scored second again later after an onside kick recovery and 25-yard run from Brock Rhodes, but officials ruled out the touchdown due to an illegal substitution infraction.

“I told them you wanted to have a program,” Hake says of his team. “It was a program game. If you want to have a program, you have to show up at the games in the program. We had guys who really wanted to show everyone that we had a program.

Valley scored on three of his first four possessions of the game as Jhordan Peete scored on a 1-yard dive at 8:18 of the first quarter, Jon’Trell Mixon added a 3-yard run with 9:22 remaining in the second quarter and an 8-yard run from Lindsey with just eight seconds left before halftime.

United scored on their opening possession, an impressive 12-play, 60-yard drive with Courtney connecting with Grant Knight on a 10-yard pass to take and a 7-6 early lead at 4:09 of the first. quarter.

United added a 30-yard field goal by Courtney with 3:59 left in the second quarter to make it 14-10 in favor of Valley Christian. That kick came at the end of another 10-game long drive.

“We are in good health” Ogilvie said with a laugh that the positives of the game for his Eagles. “We are healthy in a difficult and hard-fought physical game like this. Being healthy is key.

United will be looking to bounce back as they host the Leetonia Bears this Friday night. Valley will play at home again on Saturday night against Lisbon.

UNITED: 7- 3- 0-7–17

VALLEY: 6-14-16-0–36

RATING

VC-Jhordan Peete 8 run (blocked kick)

U-Grant Knight 10 passes from Luke Courtney (Courtney kick)

VC-Jon’Trell Mixon Track 3 (Mixon Track)

U-Courtney 30 field goal

VC-Ja’Sean Lindsey Race 8 (Race Failure)

VC-Lindsey 1 course (Lindsey course)

VC-Marques Gibbs 42 back fumble

U-Hayden Castro 32 pass from Courtney (Courtney kick)

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UVC

First attempts 15 14

Total meters 230,291

Ruling yards 112,226

Passing 118 65

Comp-Att-Int 12-24-1 5-11-1

Flat 1-34 1-30

Fumbles-Lost 1-1 1-0

Penalties-Yards 12-86 7-47

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INDIVIDUAL LEADERS

PREVIOUS – United, Luke Courtney 14-65; Valley, Ja’Sean Lindsey 17-130, Jhordan Peete 12-70.

PASSING–United, Luke Courtney 12-24-2-1; Valley, Jhordan Peete 5-11-65-0-1.

RECEPTION – United, Grant Knight 5-40 Hayden Castro 2-27, Brock Rhodes 3-15; Vallee, Phillip Spradley 2-29, VeShun Gurley 2-19.

INTERCEPTIONS United, Brock Rhodes; Vallee, Tyler Adams.

FUMBLE RECOVERIES-Valley, Marquez Gibbs.




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Hogs continue sweeping streak with wins over Trojans and Panthers https://masterdiver.net/hogs-continue-sweeping-streak-with-wins-over-trojans-and-panthers/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 03:48:00 +0000 https://masterdiver.net/hogs-continue-sweeping-streak-with-wins-over-trojans-and-panthers/ The Razorbacks returned to Barnhill Arena for a pair of games on Friday and went 2-0 without dropping a set for the fifth game in a row, with wins over Little Rock and Florida International. It’s the first time Arkansas has held five consecutive games since the 2001 season, and the Hogs are currently 6-1 […]]]>

The Razorbacks returned to Barnhill Arena for a pair of games on Friday and went 2-0 without dropping a set for the fifth game in a row, with wins over Little Rock and Florida International.

It’s the first time Arkansas has held five consecutive games since the 2001 season, and the Hogs are currently 6-1 this season.

Junior Taylor Head led the day for the Razorbacks and had 25 kills over the two games with 11 digs in Game 1 for a double-double. His .545 hit percentage in Game 1 was a team high. Sophomore setter Hannah Hogue led both games in assists with 48 total, and graduate setter Gracie Ryan had 26 assists and a double-double in Game 2 with 12 digs.

In the Hogs’ game against Little Rock, they held the Trojans to .029 save percentage, which is a new season high for the team. The Razorbacks also had eight service aces from four different players against the Trojans.

First game: Little Rock
While both teams played close to the start, Arkansas ignited the fire with a four-point streak that featured back-to-back aces from Jill Gillen and went up 9-5. After a timeout from Little Rock, the Trojans scored three more points, but the Hogs fought back with five straight games, capped by a pair of game-clinching wins from Maggie Cartwright, which extended the lead to 16-8. Little Rock curled up and regrouped with a 7-3 run, but the Hogs reached 20 on a Hailey Dirrigl kill. The Trojans bungled the set point twice, but the Razorbacks an offensive error from Little Rock closed it 25-18 in favor of the Hogs.

The Razorbacks rolled early in the second set with a 7-1 streak with pocket aces from Head, which forced a timeout from Little Rock. Arkansas kept the pressure on and extended the lead to 10 on a Cartwright kill, which made it 17-7. The Trojans added just one more point in the set, but the Hogs responded with eight unanswered points, including two Gillen kills, for the 25-8 second-set victory. Arkansas held Little Rock to a -0.088 clip in the set, the Hogs’ second-lowest percentage all season and the first time they’ve kept an opponent in single-digit points in a set.

The Trojans first threatened early in the third set and trailed by two, but a four-point run spurred by a kill from sophomore Jada Lawson gave Arkansas a 6-4 advantage. The Hogs kept up the momentum from there and pulled away to 10-6 on an ace from Tatum Shipes and Little Rock called time. The Trojans added three runs, but the Hogs chained five with two kills from Cartwright, one from Lawson and Head and an ace from Courtney Jackson and went up 19-9. Little Rock went 4-2 but couldn’t mount a big enough comeback, and three straight Arkansas wins sealed the third set 25-14 for a game sweep in Arkansas.

Second game: CRF
The Hogs and Panthers stayed close in Game 2 of the day to start, but Arkansas went up two to 15-13 on FIU offensive errors in media timeout. The Hogs pulled away with a pair of kills from Gillen and Head for a four-point lead and the Panthers called again. The teams traded points, but Arkansas limited the FIU to one at a time while another Head kill gave the Razorbacks a 22-17 advantage. FIU used their final timeout, but Arkansas went 3-1 and kills from Gillen and Shipes closed the first 25-18.

The Razorbacks hit the ground immediately in the second set and quickly took a 6-1 lead. The Panthers tacked on four runs from there, but the Hogs held on to a doubled lead at 10-5 on a head kill. FIU then made a 4-1 run to reduce Arkansas’ advantage, which was answered with a Panthers error and a Cartwright kill to regain the lead at four at the media break. FIU cut the deficit to just one, but three straight Arkansas runs made it 22-18, and the Panthers called time. FIU crossed the 20-point threshold and wasted a set point for the Razorbacks, but an FIU offensive error put it in the hands of Arkansas, 25-21.

Neither team led by more than two in the opening points of the third set, but Arkansas capitalized on FIU mistakes to solidify the lead and picked up three straight points, including a Dirrigl kill and an ace. of Ryan for a 15-9 advantage. After the media timeout, FIU gained ground with five points, but Arkansas added four, including two Panthers errors. FIU curled up 19-14 again, and while the Hogs were first at 20, the Panthers put the pressure on and used a three-point streak to get closer to three. FIU threatened again after their final timeout and crushed three match points for the Hogs, but a service error made it 25-22 to complete the Arkansas sweep.

Next
Arkansas takes on Colorado in the Arkansas Invitational Finals on Sunday, Sept. 11 at 1 p.m. at Barnhill Arena. Colorado is also 2-0 in the tournament with two sweeps, and the Buffaloes have won 14 straight sets to Arkansas’ 15. The match will be broadcast live on SEC Network+, and tickets are available online or in person.

More information
Visit ArkansasRazorbacks.com for the latest information on all things Arkansas volleyball. You can also find the Hogs on social media by liking us on Facebook (Arkansas Razorback Volleyball) and following us on Twitter and Instagram (@RazorbackVB).

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ISA Provider Better Future Forward Establishes Compliance Plan with CFPB Regulators https://masterdiver.net/isa-provider-better-future-forward-establishes-compliance-plan-with-cfpb-regulators/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 22:08:22 +0000 https://masterdiver.net/isa-provider-better-future-forward-establishes-compliance-plan-with-cfpb-regulators/ Listen to the article 6 minutes This audio is generated automatically. Please let us know if you have any comments. Revenue-sharing agreement provider Better Future Forward has entered into a final compliance plan with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and updated the information it will make to students entering ISAs to help pay for college. […]]]>

This audio is generated automatically. Please let us know if you have any comments.

Revenue-sharing agreement provider Better Future Forward has entered into a final compliance plan with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and updated the information it will make to students entering ISAs to help pay for college. .

The CFPB provided “coherent input” in a new disclosure format, Better Future Forward said wednesday — one year after the federal regulator taken action against Virginia-based nonprofit and branded ISAs as a form of credit.

Better Future Forward said it would publicly share the new disclosure format, but it did not release a copy with its Wednesday announcement.

The new format adapts a disclosure style used for traditional private education loans, Better Future Forward CEO Kevin James said in an email. A dollar cost of funding will be listed at the top of the disclosure. Since the amount of a student’s eventual refund will vary depending on their income, the new disclosure will also be supplemented with a description of how the costs are estimated.

Previously, Better Future Forward disclosures included key ISA terms like percentage of income to be paid and amounts to be repaid at different income levels. New documents will still contain this information, but it will now be located lower.

Better Future Forward says the maximum students could pay under its ISAs is an effective annual percentage rate of 7.5% and they don’t have to make payments unless they earn more than $42,500. $ per year. Repayments are complete when a student makes 120 payments, 20 years have passed, or they have reached a prepayment amount.

A Long Debate About ISA Regulation

ISAs are agreements under which investors or other funds pay for student tuition, such as tuition and fees. In turn, students agree to pay a percentage of their earnings after graduation for a set period of time, although they often make no payments until they reach a certain earnings threshold.

These arrangements were highly regarded by some higher education leaders and college access advocates who sought new ways for students to pay their tuition. Some ISA funders have argued that they minimize the worst financial risk to students and that they are not in debt and should not be regulated as such.

But last September, the CFPB ordered Better Future Forward to stop saying ISAs aren’t loans.

“Regardless of the name on the label, these products are credited and must comply with federal consumer protections,” the acting CFPB director said at the time.

The CFPB said Better Future Forward misrepresents the nature of ISAs, fails to comply with federal law governing private student loans, and imposes illegal prepayment penalties. But the regulator did not impose financial penalties on the association because it cooperated.

Better Future Forward is a very small provider. It says it has set up over 200 students with more than $2 million in funding since 2017. It is dwarfed by other providers like Purdue University. Saving a Boiler ISA program, which has over 1,600 contracts disbursing funds of over $17.9 million.

Nevertheless, higher education observers have seen the actions of the CFPB as an important development in an ISA market that lacked regulatory clarity. Critics also feared it was a crackdown that could harm the industry.

This was not the end of regulatory measures focused on ISAs and private lending.

In January, the CFPB said it would be examine the operations of colleges that lend directly to students. Two months later, the US Department of Education issued a reminder to colleges, telling them to explain the costs and terms of private student loans – including ISAs.

Purdue has since said its Back a Boiler program is not available to new applicants, but students currently participating are unaffected. Purdue drew criticism from an advocacy group, the Student Borrower Protection Center, which said the program was risky for students. A university spokesperson told MarketWatch in June that the program has been suspended for new students due to a change in the companies serving it.

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